Short Courses - 2019

21st-23rd January - Computer-Assisted Qualitative and Mixed Methods Data Analysis

Dr Christina Silver and Dr Sara Bulloch

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the role of NVivo in the analytic workflow of qualitative and mixed methods data analysis, enabling researchers to systematise analyses and manage the analysis of text, image, audio and video data, Content includes: the Five-Level QDA® method; the software components of NVivo; and techniques for translating analytic tasks into software tools. Throughout the course participants will use their own research data, or sample data, and the course tutors will illustrate how to harness NVivo using a range of different types of research projects.

 

4th-6th February – Agent Based Modelling for Social Scientists

Dr Corinna Elsenbroich

This courses introduces participants to the foundational theoretical and practical aspects of simulating social interactions in virtual research labs using agent-based modelling. Content includes: conceptualising a research question; obtaining data, operationalisation and formalisation of data; model implementation; and model analysis and interpretation. In addition to the theoretical content you will learn the ABM programming language NetLogo.

 

11th-13th February - Statistical Modelling in R

Professor Ian Brunton-Smith

This course demonstrates how quantitative analysis techniques can be used to leverage data and answer complex questions about the social world. Content includes: linear regression; logistic regression; multinomial and ordinal regression; factor analysis; interaction effects and nonlinear relationships; models for spatial data. Throughout the course, the emphasis is on the underlying principles and uses of statistical models and not on the mathematical and statistical theory.Computer exercises in R will accompany the formal teaching sessions.

 

18th-20th February - Multilevel Modelling for Social Scientists (in R)

Professor Ian Brunton-Smith

This course introduces methods for modelling multilevel data structures. Starting with basic concepts in multilevel modelling and the fundamentals of random intercept and random coefficient models, the course will then cover more advanced topics including: nonlinear models for binary responses, repeated measures, and cross-classified models.

 

25th-27th February - Practical Survey Design and Web Based Methods

Dr Patten Smith and Dr Robert Meadows

This course introduces participants to the general principles of survey design, before considering some of the central challenges facing survey methodology in the move to online data collection. The methodological focus of the course will be underpinned by examples of substantive empirical work from survey practitioners. Participants will also gain first hand experience of online survey design.

 

 

4th-6th March - Computer-Assisted Qualitative and Mixed Methods Data Analysis

Dr Christina Silver and Dr Sara Bulloch

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the role of NVivo in the analytic workflow of qualitative and mixed methods data analysis, enabling researchers to systematise analyses and manage the analysis of text, image, audio and video data, Content includes: the Five-Level QDA® method; the software components of NVivo; and techniques for translating analytic tasks into software tools. Throughout the course participants will use their own research data, or sample data, and the course tutors will illustrate how to harness NVivo using a range of different types of research projects.

 

11th-13th March - Complex Social Systems

Dr Corinna Elsenbroich

This course introduces participants to complex social systems and the challenges of complexity social science and policy research. Two methods are covered in particular: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Process Tracing/Bayesian Updating. Both methods will be introduced through real world case studies and situated within the research and policy process.

 

18th-20th March - Participatory Systems mapping

Dr Pete Barbrook-Johnson and Dr Alexandra Penn

This course will introduce the innovative participatory systems mapping methodology being developed by researchers in the Centre for Research in Social Simulation and Centre for the Evaluation of Complexity Across the Nexus, in the Department of Sociology, which allows researchers to bring together diverse knowledge and stakeholders in order to construct shared causal maps of an issue or system. This will include the theory behind, and analytical approaches to, systems maps, as well as the wider value and use of participatory modelling approaches such as systems mapping.

 

29th April-1st May - Online Social Research

Dr Christine Hine

This course gives an overview of online research methods as deployed within contemporary social research. It will develop your critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches to social research, and offer you an opportunity to develop some initial practical skills in applying these approaches. Rather than focusing in depth on any one method, the aim is to give you the confidence to select methods appropriately and to provide a foundation for develop your skills further independently in future.

 

7th-9th May - Social Network Analysis

Dr Giulia Berlusconi

This course introduces the key concepts, methods, and applications of social network analysis in the social sciences. Content includes: graph theory and the fundamentals of social network analysis; descriptive networks and individual-level statistics; methods for testing hypotheses about social network structure; and models for social networks. The emphasis will be on applying social network analysis theories and methods to real-world data, and on understanding and interpreting results, rather than on the underlying mathematics. Computer exercises in R will accompany the formal teaching sessions.

 

Further details on all of the courses currently being offered by the Department of Sociology are available here.